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Profiling: Hindi Vs Non Hindi Markets

    One way to understand the market is through the language spoken by consumers. And in India, it can be broadly divided into Hindi and non-Hindi speaking population. The data can be further sliced to look at differences between Hindi speaking states.

    For example, Chandigarh is vastly different from Patna in all aspects – demographics to economic affluence. This article is an attempt to understand the major differences between the Hindi and non-Hindi speaking markets through three parameters – urbanisation, education and female population. In the next article, we’ll look at what people own in these two markets.

    We have considered 14 states as Hindi speaking states, mainly based on percentage of people who can talk in Hindi as per 2001 Census data (Yes, that’s the last time Census released data on languages spoken). Marathi is the mother tongue for Maharashtra, but they would come under Hindi speaking state because a large proportion of the population can talk in Hindi. A detailed table can be seen at the end of this article.

    What can these indicators speak of:
    Urbanisation – more non-farm employment opportunities, higher share of service sector jobs, more opportunities to move ahead economically
    Literacy – ability to read and understand issues and take an informed decision.
    Share of female population – how are women treated in the society.

    In terms of population, Hindi speaking states account for nearly two-thirds of India’s population. But in other parameters – urbanisation, literacy and share of female population – they lag behind.

    State-wise data on the parameters used in the analysis, see the map below.

    In the second-part of the series in understanding Hindi vs Non-Hindi speaking markets, we will look at affluence as measured by ownership of assets like two or four wheelers etc. For more data, please check HowIndiaLives.com, India’s most granular database covering all the 715,000 geographical locations.

    (John is co-founder of How India Lives)

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